Pushing the Envelope

By installing mail addressing equipment, in-plants can offer even more services to their customers.

IN-PLANTS WITH mail imaging capabilities do more than address their customers’ mail; they offer their clients added convenience and improved service, which ultimately leads to satisfied customers.

“The main advantage is that one of our departments can come to us, hand the project to us and they are done. We address it, tab it, fold it and mail it. We take care of it all,” says Dwayne Weaver, manager of campus mail at the University of Georgia, in Athens, Ga.

Today’s mail imaging equipment can go way beyond simple addressing. Some in-plants are equipped to print colors, graphics and a variety of fonts and type sizes—value-added services that further benefit customers. Below is a look at several university in-plants that have invested in mail imaging equipment.

Michigan State University
East Lansing, Mich.
MAILING EQUIPMENT: Kirk-Rudy NetJet
OPERATIONS MANAGER: Dennis Seybert

Although MSU has only been running its Kirk-Rudy NetJet for a short time, Dennis Seybert couldn’t be more pleased with initial results. The new machine, which included an upgrade to HP print heads, instantly ramped up the in-plant’s addressing capabilities. The unit was put to work almost immediately after arrival.

“We started producing live jobs on the second day the machine was here. Our operators were running it while they were still being trained,” Seybert comments. “The machine was installed last week and we have already shipped 20 jobs. That’s impressive.”

Seybert considers the plant a high-volume mail operation, mailing 500,000 to 550,000 pieces a month. The plant handles the bulk mailings of the university (several hundred pieces), often sending out marketing and communications materials.

The Importance of Color

Because it prints so many promotional pieces, the in-plant sought out mailing equipment that would print color.

“We have customers that do mailings where they are trying to get seminars filled up with seats,” Seybert notes. “Color is important to them because they want to be able to add ‘Early Bird Special’ or something like that in bold red font. We weren’t able to do that before.”

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